WHAT IF MY NEW JOB IS WRONG FOR ME?

WHAT IF MY NEW JOB IS WRONG FOR ME?

Frank Judd, Director of Client Accounts, answers all of our questions about finding, obtaining, and thriving in a new job or role.

DO YOU HAVE ANY ADVICE ABOUT RESEARCHING A COMPANY THAT MAY NOT BE OBVIOUS?

Speak to people in other industries at varying functions. Learn what occurs in many spaces at different levels. Ask questions that are general. Ask questions that are granular. You really just want to find out what other people actually do. This will help you be more well rounded, researched, and prepared in a broader spectrum of business situations and environments.

WHAT IS THE SHORTEST AMOUNT OF TIME I CAN WORK FOR AN EMPLOYER WITHOUT LOOKING LIKE A FLAKE?

Only you can answer that. It’s really up to you to assess if you are currently at a place that is giving you what you need professionally, personally, and (of course) financially.

The generic answer answer is that you should be able to know if the organization is right for you. if this role is right for you and if you are right for the whole within 90 days. After that 90 day period, you are already at a point, in most scenarios, where you are in the role. The first few weeks you are onboarding, you are meeting people, you’re maybe dabbling in the work but you’re not really inundated with the work yet. After those 90 days, you’re in it. You should be carrying out your expected functions, thinking strategically, executing on determined plans, etc. You should really have already started to get the ball rolling essentially. At this point you will really start to notice the culture. Now is the time where you would assess if you are a true cultural fit and if you are vibing with the people you are working with.

HOW DOES THAT IMPACT YOUR RESUME? DO YOU EVEN PUT IT ON YOUR RESUME OR DO YOU LEAVE A GAP?

Again, that’s a choice each individual has to make him or herself. It comes down to what you can speak to better. If you feel more comfortable articulating a gap in your resume than you are explaining that you tried an opportunity that didn’t work out, do it. You just want to be able to articulate the reasoning and motive behind your decisions and your professional movement. That’s really all you can do in this situation.

If you have a proven pattern of being fickle, then yes you may have a reason to be concerned. This is when you should really begin to reconfigure your assessment process. I would wonder if you are you really taking the time to assess every situation you have been a part of and if are you asking the right questions.

The current climate dictates what is “normal.” There are so many emerging markets, such as cannabis, that there really aren’t cultural precedents for yet. You kind of have to try before you know if it’s right for you.

It does tend to become somewhat of a red flag when it appears to be a pattern; however, if you’ve showed loyalty or tenure previously, I don’t necessarily see it as a red flag. If you can prove or speak to the fact that every move you’ve made has given you an extra skill set and has enhanced you professionally, that’s ideal. Prove that you have taken a step up because of each move.

It’s not necessarily tied to your title because another red flag is someone who appears to be title hungry. You should convey that every move you’ve made has been for a title and for money.

You want to show that you have really gained skills in each role that add value. You are showing that you have gained invaluable experience at each role that allows you to have the advantage and to be professionally proficient at many levels in many scenarios and environments. Show you are competent and be able to qualify and quantify it.

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